The Great Ocean Road:

We spent another night at the service centre so we could be back into Aussie Wide for the second stage of the repairs. We made a change to the water tanks so now we can fill one tank with pure drinking water and fill the other with creek water and not have the two mixed. It means we can virtually have a shower anywhere we are without using our drinking water.

It took longer than the boys at Ausssie Wide anticipated so we needed another day. This time we parked away from the trucks and the night was a lot quieter.

We had spent the time visiting the THINC project office as we are still owed some money from them. As usual the Uni owes them so the circle goes around. We caught the tram in from Coburg as we knew this traveled past the office. While we were in Coburg we stopped at our favourite bakery and picked up the fresh bread we got fat on while working here. It was still $1.80 and was just as nice as we remembered it. Luckily we are moving on again as we haven’t had bread for a couple of months now.

Along with the few jobs we had asked for they also redid the seals on the windows and gave us a new toilet as the float in the old one broke.

The Aussie Wide team were as good as ever and nothing was a bother to them.

We were good to go and finally departed Melbourne at 12 noon. It actually was a good feeling knowing everything was back to ship shape even though none of the small breaks particullarly annoyed us.

We passed Geelong heading towards Torquay to the start of the Great Ocean Road. We’d visited Bells Beach last time we were in Melbourne but this was all new territory now. It was cold and raining in Melbourne when we left but as we reached the Great Ocean Road the weather cleared for us to be able to witness the scenery  in all it’s glory.

Over looking the ocean at "Split Point Light House" Aireys Inlet. This light house was used in "Mad Max" and "Round the Twist"

Over looking the ocean at “Split Point Light House” Aireys Inlet. This light house was used in “Mad Max” and “Round the Twist”

Through the Memorial Arch which tells who and why this road was built. Winding around the coast line with plenty of places to pull over and enjoy the view and a coffee.

This is the third Arch due to the road being widened and the "Ash Wednesday" fires.

This is the third Arch due to the road being widened and the “Ash Wednesday” fires.

 

If you want to read why it was built click on the photo once, when it opens click on to it again.

If you want to read why it was built click on the photo once, when it opens click on to it again.

 

"Coffee breaks" with million $$ views.

“Coffee breaks” with million $$ views.

The towns along the route are very touristie and built up as you can see here driving through Lorne.

Driving through Lorne.

Driving through Lorne.

You can understand why this road takes you longer than going inland as you are constantly stopping to take photo’s and admire the view.

After looking forward to a "beach hit" this was a great way to have our fill.

After looking forward to a “beach hit” this was a great way to have our fill.

We stopped at a free camp spot at Johanna (incorrectly named) after a ship wreak the “Joanna” in 1843. This was a lovely spot with “drop toilets” and water right beside the ocean.

The camping ground is extensive and you don't feel closed in. We will have to come back one day to try the fishing.

The camping ground is extensive and you don’t feel closed in. We will have to come back one day to try the fishing.

We walked out to the viewing platforms over looking the beach and had this wonderful shot of the sun setting through the clouds that were now rolling back in. It was so soothing to go to sleep listening to the waves pounding on the shore.

It would have been a 5km cove with only the people from the park on it.

It would have been a 5km cove with only the people from the park on it.

 

Johanna Beach in the morning.

Johanna Beach in the morning.