A visit from Nola and Lloyd:

Last Sunday my sister and brother in law, Nola and Lloyd, came out to the farm to spend the day with us. I had awaited this visit with excitment for the last couple of weeks, after Nola told me they were planning to visit.

They stayed in Goondiwindi Saturday and Sunday night and visited some friends of theirs there, Lew and Jan Verney. Lew is the deputy principle of the high school and Jan is a grade 6 teacher there.

They then drove the 112km out to the farm Sunday morning and after a coffe and a catch up with all the family news we gave thema tour of the camp where they got to speak to a few of the farm hands who were on a day off. The Irish boys tried to get Nola, to convince us to stay on after the 6 weeks.

We then piled into our car and set off to show them a bit of the farm.

We’ve tried to explain the size of this place but unless you actually see it for yourself it is hard to imagine. We started at “The Pad” where the farm’s machinery is stored and where the daily meetings take place with all the farm employees before work begins each morning. It was then on to the “Gin” where the cotton bales will soon be processed in the thousands and then out to “Trefusis”. This is where some of the farm managers and workers live. We stop at Reservoir 3 & 4 and are still amazed at the amount of water on the farm. These are the smallest of four resevoirs.

Chris and Nola taking in the size of the place.

Chris and Nola taking in the size of the place.

Lloyd taking photos

Lloyd taking photos

This is where you get some idea of how big this property is. Standing high on the reservoir walls you can see for miles. We notice some of the fields of cotton are still green while the fields right next door are nearly white. This is from the crop duster planes spraying certain fields with chemicals to inhibit the growth cycle so harvest doesn’t all happen at once. They’ve to get this right as if the cotton falls to the ground before the pickers go through the field it is useless and millions of dollars will be lost.

Cotton fields last week.

Cotton fields last week.

 

Cotton fields this week. Notice the paddock closer is now brown and it has cotton all over it.

Cotton fields this week. Notice the paddock closer is now brown and it has cotton all over it.

Slowly turning white with cotton.

Slowly turning white with cotton.

I don’t think Lloyd appreciated my description of how cotton goes from a flower bud to a tuft of soft cotton bursting out and then proceeds to look like a old tampon. They say by the end of the season the area looks like it’s blanketed in snow. Cotton strewn all over the roadways and fields for miles around, which sounds fine until you relaise it’s not fluffy and white but dirty and straggly.

From flower - bud - cotton bursting open - to old tampon.

From flower – bud – cotton bursting open – to old tampon.

It was wonderful being able to chat to Nola and Lloyd and catch up on things. I really appreciated the time spent with them.

I would also like to thank them for bringing out our blower, one that I can actually lift without putting out my back. That made the job of cleaning around the donger’s much quicker.

 

Ours looks puny beside our boss's. But even he said his arms ache after awhile. Nothing is small on this farm.

Ours looks puny beside our boss’s. But even he said his arms ache after awhile. Nothing is small on this farm.