Goondiwindi Show:-

The 2nd and 3rd of May bought the show to town again and this time we were prepared.
Last year we didn’t know we could park the car inside the show grounds and therefore we didn’t take chairs or the camera but this year everything was packed.

The only difference this year was the weather…it was freezing.
We’d been in shorts the day before the show and a week later we were back into shorts again – but on that day it didn’t get over 16 deg and if we’d been in Melbourne they would have quoted a wind chill factor on top of that!
I had on my jeans, a long sleeve T shirt, a vest and a jumper. If we sat watching the events I had Chris sitting on the wind side. Even with my usual “Hot flushes” I didn’t get my jumper off all day.

None of that spoiled the day, however.
We watched the sheep dog trials, which we love. Every dog had his or her own personality.
One dog saw it’s owner’s little daughter outside the fence and didn’t know whether to round her up or the sheep. The father quickly picked up the little girl and moved her back from the sight of the dog so it could concentrate.

The dogs are nimble and quick and love doing their jobs.

The dogs are nimble and quick and love doing their jobs.

The fruit and flower display was just as creative this year. There was no second guessing what this creature was and this is from the under 13s.

People are so creative, I would never have thought of this.

People are so creative, I would never have thought of this.

Gundy is never short of talented gardeners and we often just drive around town and admire people’s gardens. As you can see the roses are out. This town definitely has a much higher percentage of people who look after their homes than most other towns or cities.

The flowers are always a lovely display.

The flowers are always a lovely display.

It was off to the “Camp Draft” next to see cattle being round up in great a display of skill and horsemanship . This year I asked a lady what the rules were.

First the rider had to break two steers out from a herd of 8-10, then separate one of those two out.
This in itself requires a high degree of horsemanship.
The gates would then be opened and the selected animal, horse and rider would be let out the gates where the job is to maneuver the cattle around posts placed in the arena.
This was a left hand course I was told, that meant they had to maneuver the animal left around the first pole, right around the second and then left around the third.
If at any time the animal went off course it was over and the judge would crack his whip to signal this.
It was wonderful to see these amazing horses being put through their paces.

Separating two from the herd first. The people lined up are the next contestants.

Separating two from the herd first. The people lined up are the next contestants.

The judges and the gate openers.

The judges and the gate openers.

Then it's off after the steer to direct them around the first post.

Then it’s off after the steer to direct them around the first post.

All ages compete to run these animals down.

All ages compete to run these animals down.

You have to be right on their tails to get them where you want them to go.

You have to be right on their tails to get them where you want them to go.

Most of the time the animals obviously forgot to read the rule book and didn’t want to help out.
Then a group of riders would round up the offender and send them back to the rest of the herd. They are obviously of a group mentality, if they proved hard to round up a few more cattle would be released from the yard making it easier to round them all up instead of one rebel.

We then watched the wool handlers comp. This job would keep you on your toes. Sorting the wool into baskets, keeping the shearers area clean and then rolling the fleece after picking and the skirt of the fleece so as not to take too much off or leave dirty bits on. This all while being watched closely by by judges.

Wool handlers job is too hard for me.

Wool handlers job is too hard for me.

By late afternoon we had decided not to stay for the evening events as the temperature was dropping further. It’s also a precarious game of dodgems with the kangaroos driving back to the farm after dark and the heater in the car was a welcome comfort the way home.
All in all it was a great day out as we love the Goondiwindi show.